Roger Moore Proves Tom Hardy Isn’t Too Old For 007

Roger Moore Proves Tom Hardy Isn't Too Old For 007

Tom Hardy is a popular fan casting to take over the role of James Bond, and a different past 007 actor proves the Venom star isn’t too old.

Some wonder if fan-favorite casting Tom Hardy is too old to play James Bond, but the age of a previous 007 says he isn’t. The time has come to cast a new actor as the world-famous fictional spy, as 2021’s release of No Time to Die saw Daniel Craig’s 15-year tenure in the James Bond role come to an end. Craig’s five Bond movies saw both highs and lows, but in the end, most audiences agreed that he did a great job overall.

Hardy is one of several actors that have been steadily mentioned by Bond aficionados when discussing who should be the next 007, along with names like Idris Elba and Henry Cavill. Hardy seems to be the most popular fan-casting for Bond at the moment, although when asked about the notion publicly, he’s side-stepped the issue. Whether that means he thinks it’s unlikely, or is in talks and can’t discuss them, is of course up for debate.

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If asked, it’s hard to imagine Hardy turning down the opportunity to play Bond, as it’s one of the most iconic roles in movie history. Still, at 44-years-old, some do worry that the Venom and Mad Max: Fury Road star is simply too old to only be beginning a term as 007. After all, Daniel Craig was only 38-years-old when Casino Royale was released, and even younger when it began filming. Yet, there’s already clear precedent for Hardy not in fact being too old to play Bond, and that’s the casting of Roger Moore in the role.

Up until Daniel Craig, Roger Moore was the longest-running Bond actor, staying in the 007 role for 12 years. Moore first played Bond in 1973’s Live and Let Die, and he was 46-years-old when that movie released to theaters, two years older than Hardy. By the time Moore exited as Bond, following 1985’s A View to a Kill, he was 57 years old. That makes Moore the oldest man to ever play Bond in a movie, even surpassing Sean Connery’s late return for the non-EON production Never Say Never Again, which saw Connery play Bond at 53-years-old.

While it’s true that if chosen, Hardy probably wouldn’t star in his first Bond movie for at least a few more years, that would still put him at the same age or only slightly older than Moore was when he started. Also, compared to the legendary, long-running Moore, Hardy currently has a much more youthful appearance at 44 than Moore did at 46. He’s also much fitter, thanks to years of starring in comic book and action movies. Although leading men of his era weren’t expected to have six-pack abs and bulging biceps, Hardy clearly has a physical edge. With all that in mind, it’s time to put the arguments about Hardy’s age to rest, as he’s not too old to play James Bond.

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Michael Kennedy
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Michael Kennedy is an avid movie and TV fan that’s been working for Screen Rant in various capacities since 2014. In that time, Michael has written over 2000 articles for the site, first working solely as a news writer, then later as a senior writer and associate news editor. Most recently, Michael helped launch Screen Rant’s new horror section, and is now the lead staff writer when it comes to all things frightening. A FL native, Michael is passionate about pop culture, and earned an AS degree in film production in 2012. He also loves both Marvel and DC movies, and wishes every superhero fan could just get along. When not writing, Michael enjoys going to concerts, taking in live professional wrestling, and debating pop culture. A long-term member of the Screen Rant family, Michael looks forward to continuing on creating new content for the site for many more years to come.

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