Stranger Things Season 5 Will Leave Fans Wanting More, Say Creators

Stranger Things Season 5 Will Leave Fans Wanting More, Say Creators

Stranger Things ending with season 5 will feel a little premature and leave fans wanting more, according to the Netflix show’s creator Matt Duffer.

Stranger Things season 5 will leave fans wanting more, according to the show’s co-creator Matt Duffer. After a nearly three-year hiatus due to pandemic-related delays, Netflix’s popular supernatural series is set to return to the streaming service next month with a season 4 split into two volumes. The first four episodes will premiere on May 27, followed by the remaining five on July 1. Written and directed principally by the Duffer Brothers, season 4 will pick up six months after the Battle of Starcourt.

The last time audiences saw the Stranger Things crew in 2019, Billy had sacrificed himself to save Eleven, Mike, and Max from the Mind Flayer while Hopper fought and killed Grigori before being seemingly disintegrated after Joyce triggers an explosion to close the gate to the Upside Down. Season 4 will pick in the aftermath as the show’s core friend group is separated for the first time and forced to navigate the difficulties of high school while a new supernatural threat lurks in the Upside Down. However, this won’t spell the end of the show quite yet, as Stranger Things will be returning for a fifth and final season.

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Related: Why Stranger Things Is Ending With Season 5

During an interview with SFX magazine (via GamesRadar), the Duffer Brothers shared one of the first substantial teases for Stranger Things season 5. Matt says the final season will leave audiences “wanting more.” Even though this may leave fans feeling like Stranger Things is ending too soon, it “felt the right move” according to Matt. Read what he said below:

Even with five it’s going to feel like it’s ending a little early. We’re going to feel like we still have a lot more gas left in the tank. But I think that it’s better to end there with us wanting more. That’s why ending at five felt like the right move.

While die-hard Stranger Things fans might be disappointed to hear the show will wrap up with a lot of gas left in the tank, the Duffer Brothers’ decision to end the show after five seasons is completely justified and their argument is sound. It’s always better for a show to go out on a high note rather than overstaying its welcome, which some of the most acclaimed series are even guilty of, such as The Office or Dexter for example, as both arguably suffered declines in quality during their later seasons.

Other shows like Mad Men and Breaking Bad wrapped up at just the right time, the latter ending after 5 seasons, which is considered a sweet spot for dramas. As many shows have proven, more is not always better. With a strong final season, the Duffer Brothers should be able to preserve the show’s legacy and leave fans wanting more, which they might even get. Stranger Things will always have the opportunity to continue the franchise and explore additional stories via Netflix spinoffs, which the Duffers are open to.

Next: Stranger Things’ Season 5 Ending Plan Is Exactly What The Show Needs

Source: SFX magazine (via GamesRadar)

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Adam Bentz
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Adam Bentz is a movie and TV news writer for Screen Rant. From a young age, Adam has been interested in a wide range of movies and television, but it was talented auteurs like Quentin Tarantino, Paul Thomas Anderson, and Aaron Sorkin who ultimately sparked his interest in the craft. Motivated by his love for the screen, Adam studied creative writing with a concentration in screenwriting at Southern New Hampshire University.

After graduating, Adam interned as a writer with The Borgen Project, a nonprofit organization working to end extreme poverty. Other than writing for Screen Rant, Adam reviews films on his website adambentz.wordpress.com

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